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lonehands:

demons for plaths

lonehands:

demons
for plaths

He spoke of human solitude, about the intrinsic loneliness of a sophisticated mind, one that is capable of reason and poetry but which grasps at straws when it comes to understanding another, a mind aware of the impossibility of absolute understanding. The difficulty of having a mind that understands that it will always be misunderstood.
— Nicole Krauss, Man Walks Into a Room (via thehiddenabyss)

(via tolosemymemory)

ankosv:

jasmin shokrian spring summer 2003

ankosv:

jasmin shokrian spring summer 2003

In life, everyone without distinction, young or old, speaks to others or launch into creation for one reason, the need to assert their presence in the world, in the hope of being understood and recognized. My work, for example, can be interpreted as the glowing expression of a desire to attract attention on myself, but in fact, at the time I visited Rome, I was looking for the opposite. To solve the problems of our environment, so threatened today, we should, before declaring ourselves greens or volunteers, start to give up all this unnecessary rag bag that represents the accumulation of meaning and various creations essentially based on our need of expression and recognition. If I follow this logic to the end, I should have died young, it would have been more beneficial to the planet.
To pollute water without scruples, and only realize the trouble caused the day dead fishes float on the surface of the river… that is usually human behavior. This is what I’ve always thought deep inside, and it probably explains why I launched myself into the world of Vanity Fair, and why I started creating useless things. In the beginning of my career, I just wanted to see women wear men’s clothes. Back then, Japanese women systematically wore very feminine imported clothes, and I didn’t like it.
— Yohji Yamamoto (via ankosv)
chromeburger:

This is truly what I look like right now lmfao

chromeburger:

This is truly what I look like right now lmfao

(via howtodresswell)

Naturalistic empiricism, the appeal to natural “fact” and the experience of nature as a means of scientific “proof” and certainty, is therefore basically an appeal to the effectiveness of our own cultural controls. It uses the experience of nature that is produced through the
application of those controls as a means to justify and extend them. And so it forms the foundation of “straight” or ideologically acceptable science, the creative use of the “given” or “innate” part of our total conception of things for the corroboration and extension of the “artificial” and humanly adjustable part. Because it is based on our ideological distinction specifying which things, and which kinds of things, are “given,” innate, and unchangeable, and which are not, as an unquestioned article of faith, its rules, procedures, techniques, and methodologies are devices for the reassertion and reinvention of this distinction and the ideology that corresponds to it. And because naturalistic science is therefore always a means of reinforcing and reapplying this distinction, its application is always part of the invention of our own culture.
— Roy Wagner, The Invention of Culture [PDF] (via mbo-romi)

(via mbo-romi-deactivated20140114)

beautiful.

(via gothgrl)

A wild population of any species consists always of individuals whose genetic constitution varies widely. In other words, potentiality and readiness for change is already built into the survival unit. … The artificially homogenized populations of man’s domestic animals and plants are scarcely fit for survival.
— Gregory Bateson - Form, Substance and Difference (1970)
mineralis:

spring1999:
vogue october 1998 “surviving stress” photographed by hiro

mineralis:

spring1999:

vogue october 1998 “surviving stress” photographed by hiro

(via ukitai)

l-acus:

natalia vodianova photographed by bryan adams for harper’s bazaar russia, july ‘12.

l-acus:

natalia vodianova photographed by bryan adams for harper’s bazaar russia, july ‘12.

(via creepyyeha)

Although most boys figure out how to bring themselves to orgasm by age thirteen, half of girls do not have their first orgasms until their late teens, twenties, or beyond. Teenage girls widely agree that they get the message loud and clear that masturbation is something boys do, but girls do not, cannot, or should not. The cultural focus on intercourse tells young women to expect they will begin to experience sexual pleasure once they have sex with a man (whether or not they are even interested in sex with men). Nearly all teen boys, on the other hand, experience sexual pleasure long before they get their hands—or other body parts—into a partner’s pants. Despite the massive advances in women’s equality, young women’s sexuality is stuck in a surprising paradox. Young women are sold provocative clothes but are not taught where to find their own clitoris. Many girls give their boyfriends oral sex, but are too uncomfortable with their own bodies to allow the guys to return the favor. It is still a radical act to say that women need and deserve access to information about their own sexual pleasure—not just about the risks and negative consequences of sex.

(via compulsives)

Reblogging again for reasons

(via misandry-mermaid)

(via )

(via eiknarf)

losed:

Marta.Gil
When you feel perpetually unmotivated, you start questioning your existence in an unhealthy way; everything becomes a pseudo intellectual question you have no interest in responding whatsoever. This whole process becomes your very skin and it does not merely affect you; it actually defines you. So, you see yourself as a shadowy figure unworthy of developing interest, unworthy of wondering about the world - profoundly unworthy in every sense and deeply absent in your very presence.
— Ingmar Bergman (via viage)

(via viage)

youmightfindyourself:

itwonlast: Kintsugi (to patch with gold) or Kintsukuroi (to repair with gold) is the Japanese art of fixing broken pottery and ceramics using a lacquer resin sprinkled with powdered gold (or silver). Rather than being concealed, the damage is celebrated and becomes a defining feature of the object. As a general rule, the repaired artifact acquires far higher value and enjoys greater appreciation than it had in its previously undamaged state.

youmightfindyourself:

itwonlastKintsugi (to patch with gold) or Kintsukuroi (to repair with gold) is the Japanese art of fixing broken pottery and ceramics using a lacquer resin sprinkled with powdered gold (or silver). Rather than being concealed, the damage is celebrated and becomes a defining feature of the object. As a general rule, the repaired artifact acquires far higher value and enjoys greater appreciation than it had in its previously undamaged state.

(via nickelcobalt)

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